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Title: Cancer Statistics in China, 2015
Authors: Chen, Wanqing
Zheng, Rongshou
Baade, Peter D.
Zhang, Siwei
Zeng, Hongmei
Bray, Freddie
Jemal, Ahmedin
Yu, Xue Qin
He, Jie
Categories: Cancer Type - All Cancers combined
Statistical & Methodological Research - Incidence & Mortality
Statistical & Methodological Research - Mathematical Modelling
Statistical & Methodological Research - Method Validation
Statistical & Methodological Research - Statistical Methods
Statistical & Methodological Research - Survival Analysis
Pub. Date: 25-Jan-2016
Journal Title: Cancer statistics in China, 2015
Abstract: With increasing incidence and mortality, cancer is the leading cause of death in China and is a major public health problem. Because of China's massive population (1.37 billion), previous national incidence and mortality estimates have been limited to small samples of the population using data from the 1990s or based on a specific year. With high-quality data from an additional number of population-based registries now available through the National Central Cancer Registry of China, the authors analyzed data from 72 local, population-based cancer registries (2009-2011), representing 6.5% of the population, to estimate the number of new cases and cancer deaths for 2015. Data from 22 registries were used for trend analyses (2000-2011). The results indicated that an estimated 4292,000 new cancer cases and 2814,000 cancer deaths would occur in China in 2015, with lung cancer being the most common incident cancer and the leading cause of cancer death. Stomach, esophageal, and liver cancers were also commonly diagnosed and were identified as leading causes of cancer death. Residents of rural areas had significantly higher age-standardized (Segi population) incidence and mortality rates for all cancers combined than urban residents (213.6 per 100,000 vs 191.5 per 100,000 for incidence; 149.0 per 100,000 vs 109.5 per 100,000 for mortality, respectively). For all cancers combined, the incidence rates were stable during 2000 through 2011 for males (+0.2% per year; P = .1), whereas they increased significantly (+2.2% per year; P < .05) among females. In contrast, the mortality rates since 2006 have decreased significantly for both males (−1.4% per year; P < .05) and females (−1.1% per year; P < .05). Many of the estimated cancer cases and deaths can be prevented through reducing the prevalence of risk factors, while increasing the effectiveness of clinical care delivery, particularly for those living in rural areas and in disadvantaged populations.
Division: Cancer Research Division
DOI: 10.3322/caac.21338
URI: http://researchpubs.cancercouncil.com.au/cancercounciljspui/handle/1/1728
Appears in Collections:Research Articles

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