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dc.contributor.authorMcCredie Men
dc.contributor.authorWilliams Sen
dc.contributor.authorCoates Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-17T09:08:55Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-17T09:08:55Zen
dc.date.issued1999en
dc.identifier.govdoc310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://researchpubs.cancercouncil.com.au/cancercounciljspui/handle/1/1366en
dc.description.abstractRoutinely collected data for New South Wales were used to analyse cancer mortality in migrants born in East or Southeast Asia according to duration of residence in Australia. A case-control approach compared deaths from cancer at particular sites with deaths from all other cancers, adjusting for age, sex and calendar period. Compared with the Australian-born, these Asian migrants had a 30-fold higher risk of dying from nasopharyngeal cancer in the first 2 decades of residence, falling to ninefold after 30 years, and for deaths from liver cancer, a 12-fold risk in the first 2 decades, falling to threefold after 30 years. The initial lower risk from colorectal, breast or prostate cancers later converged towards the Australian-born level, the change being apparent in the third decade after migration. The relative risk of dying from lung cancer among these Asian migrants was above unity for each category of duration of stay for women, but at or below unity for men, with no trend in risk over time. An environmental or lifestyle influence for nasopharyngeal and liver cancers is suggested as well as for cancers of colon/rectum, breast and prostateen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCancer mortality in East and Southeast Asian migrants to New South Wales, Australia, 1975-1995en
dc.typePeer Reviewed Journal Articleen
dc.subject.keywordsAdolescenten
dc.subject.keywordsChilden
dc.subject.keywordsChild,Preschoolen
dc.subject.keywordsComparative Studyen
dc.subject.keywordsEmigration and Immigrationen
dc.subject.keywordsepidemiologyen
dc.subject.keywordsethnologyen
dc.subject.keywordsFar Easten
dc.subject.keywordsFemaleen
dc.subject.keywordsHumansen
dc.subject.keywordsInfanten
dc.subject.keywordsAdulten
dc.subject.keywordsInfant,Newbornen
dc.subject.keywordsLungen
dc.subject.keywordsMaleen
dc.subject.keywordsMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.keywordsmortalityen
dc.subject.keywordsNeoplasmsen
dc.subject.keywordsNew South Walesen
dc.subject.keywordsprostateen
dc.subject.keywordsResearchen
dc.subject.keywordsRisken
dc.subject.keywordsAge Distributionen
dc.subject.keywordsSex Distributionen
dc.subject.keywordsSex Factorsen
dc.subject.keywordsstatistics & numerical dataen
dc.subject.keywordsTime Factorsen
dc.subject.keywordsWalesen
dc.subject.keywordsWomenen
dc.subject.keywordsAgeden
dc.subject.keywordsAged,80 and overen
dc.subject.keywordsAsia,Southeasternen
dc.subject.keywordsAustraliaen
dc.subject.keywordsbreasten
dc.subject.keywordscanceren
dc.identifier.journaltitleBr J Canceren
dc.identifier.volume79en
dc.identifier.issue7-8en
dc.identifier.pagestart1277en
dc.identifier.pageend1282en
dc.identifier.programmeHealth Services Researchen
dc.identifier.divisionCancer Research Division
Appears in Collections:Research Articles

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